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Wed 4 March 2020
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During this video, we introduce the Ambition In Motion mentor program and then interview Emma Kerr to discuss how graduate students and professionals can decide if pursuing additional education is right for them, as well as discuss Emma's professional experiences and mentor relationships. The host of this video is Ambition In Motion's founder, Garrett Mintz.
Tue 3 March 2020
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During this video, we introduce the Ambition In Motion mentor program and then interview Frank Mengert to discuss how college students and professionals can network in a genuine and meaningful way, as well as discuss Frank's professional experiences and mentor relationships. The host of this video is Ambition In Motion's founder, Garrett Mintz.

Questions that we cover include:
What does genuine networking mean to you?
What is your reason for being?
How can your life goals influence who you surround yourself with?
How can your network influence your career movement?
What is a successful person?
Do you need to practice networking? If so, how can you do that?
Are people generally helpful?
What does it take to have meaningful conversations?
How can someone practice asking more engaging questions?
How can somebody set the stage for informational interviews?
Is appropriate to take notes during meetings? If so, how can somebody take notes appropriately?
Does body language play a factor in networking and relationship building?
Does vocal inflection have an impact on networking and relationship building?
What are go-to questions to ask to get to know somebody better?
When is the right time to be vulnerable in a conversation with somebody?
When is the right time to be vulnerable in a mentor relationship?
Is it appropriate to ask for introductions from a mentor?
Mon 2 March 2020
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During this video, we introduce the Ambition In Motion mentor program and then interview Nick Smarrelli to discuss how college students and professionals can network in a genuine and meaningful way, as well as discuss Nick's professional experiences and mentor relationships. The host of this video is Ambition In Motion's founder, Garrett Mintz.

Questions that we cover include:
What does genuine networking mean to you?
What is your reason for being?
How can your life goals influence who you surround yourself with?
How can your network influence your career movement?
What is a successful person?
Do you need to practice networking? If so, how can you do that?
Are people generally helpful?
What does it take to have meaningful conversations?
How can someone practice asking more engaging questions?
How can somebody set the stage for informational interviews?
Is appropriate to take notes during meetings? If so, how can somebody take notes appropriately?
Does body language play a factor in networking and relationship building?
Does vocal inflection have an impact on networking and relationship building?
What are go-to questions to ask to get to know somebody better?
When is the right time to be vulnerable in a conversation with somebody?
When is the right time to be vulnerable in a mentor relationship?
Is it appropriate to ask for introductions from a mentor?
Sun 1 March 2020
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During this video, we introduce the Ambition In Motion mentor program and then interview Andrea Constantine to discuss how college students and professionals can network in a genuine and meaningful way, as well as discuss Andrea's professional experiences and mentor relationships. The host of this video is Ambition In Motion's founder, Garrett Mintz.

Questions that we cover include:
What does genuine networking mean to you?
What your Ikigai, or reason for being?
How can your life goals influence who you surround yourself with?
How can your network influence your career movement?
What is a successful person?
Do you need to practice networking? If so, how can you do that?
Are people generally helpful?
What does it take to have meaningful conversations?
How can someone practice asking more engaging questions?
How can somebody set the stage for informational interviews?
Is appropriate to take notes during meetings? If so, how can somebody take notes appropriately?
Does body language play a factor in networking and relationship building?
Does vocal inflection have an impact on networking and relationship building?
What are go-to questions to ask to get to know somebody better?
When is the right time to be vulnerable in a conversation with somebody?
When is the right time to be vulnerable in a mentor relationship?
Is it appropriate to ask for introductions from a mentor?
Fri 28 February 2020
Initial publishing on HR Boost.

I am interviewing Garrett Mintz, the founder of Ambition In Motion, to discuss mentor programs for small and medium-sized businesses. Garrett and his team have done extensive research into mentorship and what works and doesn’t work for implementing mentor programs. Garrett’s big focus is on leveraging the research of Work Orientation and its impact on successful mentor relationships which he shares about in this interview.

What is a common assumption that small to medium sized business owners have about their team?

That everybody already knows everybody or that they don’t have time for mentorship.

So often, I will hear from small to medium sized business owners that they don’t see a need for an employee mentor program because everybody has already worked at the company for 5+ years and that everyone knows everyone pretty well. Or that the issues between employees can’t be resolved so they are fine with leaving them unresolved and continuing on with business as normal. Or that they don’t have time for mentorship.

What most business owners are blind to is the fact that most conversations at work are superficial: “How are your kids?” “What did you do over the weekend?” “Did you complete that project?”

You have enough of these conversations over and over and over and you feel like you “know” somebody…but you really don’t.

Do you have a story you can share to elaborate on this point?

Of course!

One of our clients does tax accounting in Indianapolis. They are a 14 person firm and we started the mentor program in January.

It would be an understatement to say that the participants in our mentor program were busy and skeptical about this program. We are entering the heat of tax season and they are embarking on a mentor program…in a 14 person company where everyone knows everyone.

Needless to say, they were skeptical.

Brad and John are employees of this firm and they were matched together. Brad is a manager at the company and has been there for over 15 years. John started within the past year but has been friends with Brad for the past 3 years. In fact, Brad helped him land this job. Since they both had been friends for the past 3 years, they thought they already knew everything about each other.

They scheduled a 60 minute meeting for their first mentor meeting but were concerned that they wouldn’t have enough to talk about because they already knew each other so well.

The result…the meeting lasted for 90 minutes…they only got through 1 question on the meeting agenda we provided them…they had to schedule a second meeting in the same month complete the meeting agenda.

They learned so much about each other that they didn’t already know. They opened up about their background, their work history, their work goals, and how their personalities meshed well with each other. 

Brad and John have never had conversations like this at work before. They are now getting their work done more efficiently because they have a better understanding of what each person does and what they need as opposed to working in their own silos. Because of this increased efficiency, they are now starting on projects that were pushed out way down the line in the company’s strategic road map.

This was all accomplished within the first month of implementing the mentor program!

These types of stories happen all of the time.

What is your secret sauce? 

The key thing that we are doing that is different from most mentor programs is we are using the research behind Work Orientation to facilitate our mentor program.

Traditional methods for matching people together for mentorship don’t work.

My team and I have learned that when you match based on status within the company, years of experience, or learning a specific skill, that the mentor relationship becomes a transaction where the mentor gets nothing and only the mentee has something to gain. The issue with matching people together based on transactional metrics is that it lacks staying power and depth. Once a mentee achieves what he/she is after – or loses patience with achieving the goal, the relationship ends because the mentee has no need for the mentor anymore (e.g. after a promotion or learning a certain skill). 

This is a problem because the staying power of mentorship is what increases its impact to a business’s bottom line significantly over time.

If you can create webs of mentor relationships across your company, significantly more collaboration can occur, your team can innovate more easily, and your culture can thrive. People will show up more engaged for work every day and the ability to attract new talent to the company will happen more naturally because your employees will become ambassadors for your company, encouraging their friends and strangers to take advantage of joining the team if they get the opportunity.

My team and I have tested multiple personality tests and areas of research. We have garnered varying degrees of success with different personality assessments, but by far the most effective research area is Work Orientation. Work Orientation is how you view your work. Some people view their work as a career, while others view their work as a calling, while others view their work as a job. Work Orientation is fluid and there isn’t a right or wrong Work Orientation. When Work Orientation is aligned for a mentoring relationship, the likelihood that relationship lasts for 6 months and is considered both productive and quality is 400% greater than traditional mentor matching methods. Regardless of the department a person is in, years of experience, or status in the company, if Work Orientation is aligned for a mentor relationship, they are 400% more likely to last for 6 months and be considered productive and quality than matching on transactional metrics like the ones previously stated.

How much time does participating in a mentor program like yours normally take?

The time investment from employees in our mentor program is between 1 and 4 hours per month. If we are assuming 166 hours worked per month that is less than 2.4% of their time.

How does this translate to the bottom line?

There has been extensive research on the correlation between mentorship and work engagement and between work engagement and productivity. Essentially, if you can measure engagement changes in employee mentor program participants over time, you can measure how much more productive they are at work. This manifests itself in more sales, better customer service, greater collaboration between teams, and overall happier employees. If you can increase the likelihood of successful mentorship by 400% and continue implementing successful mentorship over time (e.g. building webs of connection), you can create a significantly positive impact on the bottom line.
Fri 28 February 2020
One common piece of advice I hear is that “you should work towards finding a calling”. The advice makes sense. I mean of you look at Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, self-actualization is at the top and it is easy to assume that finding a calling is consistent with achieving self-actualization.

But what if it’s not? What if we have it wrong?

I work in the space of implementing employee mentor programs for companies and I have studied extensively the correlation between aligned Work Orientation and the likelihood of successful mentor relationships. I have also studied correlations between different Work Orientations and levels of engagement at work.

Work Orientation is how one view’s their work. Some people view their work as a job (motivated by work/life balance), some people view their work as a career (motivated by professional growth), and some people view their work as a calling (motivated by personal/professional mission alignment).

My team and I learned that Work Orientation is fluid, meaning that it can change throughout one’s life. We also learned that when people don’t share a similar Work Orientation and are matched together for a mentoring relationship, that the likelihood that relationship lasts for 6 months and is considered both productive and quality diminishes significantly. 

But is there a correlation between one type of Work Orientation and being more engaged at work?

Our current research indicates no.

Our current research does break workplace engagement into 4 separate categories: emotional attachment to the work, energy received from doing the work, social connection with those whom doing the work with, and level of fulfillment from the work itself.

Our current research indicates that there is no one Work Orientation that is more engaged at work than another, but that some Work Orientations are more engaged in certain types of engagement than others.

People that are job oriented gain more workplace engagement from social connection with those whom they are doing the work than people that are career or calling oriented.

People that are career oriented gain more workplace engagement from the energy received doing the work than people that are job or calling oriented.

People that are calling oriented gain more workplace engagement from the level of fulfillment from the work itself than people that are career or job oriented.

The point is that maybe not everybody needs a calling. Everybody runs in their own lane and lives their own life and can achieve happiness and self-actualization in their own way. Assuming that everyone needs a calling may put people in uncomfortable situations and make them feel a way that they aren’t. And just because somebody doesn’t view their work as a calling right now doesn’t mean that they never will.

To adequately share the data and the other side of this point, our research also indicates that people that are career and calling oriented are more receptive to participating in employee mentor programs. Since employee mentorship - done successfully - leads to increased workplace engagement, greater collaboration across teams, and improved productivity, you could also make a counterargument.

Wed 19 February 2020
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Nicole Martin is Chief Empowerment Officer and Founder of HRBoost, LLC, a HR Shared Services consulting firm based in Chicago, Illinois. In recognition of her professional excellence as well as her community, Nicole has been honored by multiple organizations including most recently as one of Mirror Review’s 10 Game Changing Women in 2019. Awardee for Business Excellence by the Chicago Daily Herald, and a 2016 Enterprising Women of the Year Champion by Enterprising Women Magazine. A sought-after expert, her knowledge and advice have been featured in newspapers and magazines throughout the country. In addition, Nicole is the host online of HR in the Fast Lane and contributing writer for the Chicago Business Journal.  Nicole has authored, International Literary Award and Amazon Best Seller, The Talent Emergency, the accompanying Talent Emergency Guidebook, The Human Side of Profitability, The Power of Joy & Purpose, and her newly released co-authored book No Fear Negotiation for Women.
Tue 18 February 2020
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During this video, we introduce the Ambition In Motion mentor program and then interview David Elfman to discuss how college students and professionals can get their foot in the door for professional experiences and mentor relationships. 
Mon 17 February 2020
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Joanna Severino is the Founder & President of PREPSKILLS and the US College Expo. Joanna has been an educator for over 25 years, helping students to excel in achieving important milestones in education. For many Canadian families, applying to private schools and US colleges can be daunting. PREPSKILLS helps navigate this process by giving families the tools, resources and connections to maximize opportunities. Joanna created the US College Expo in Canada and PrepConnect events to help families explore their educational pathways. Education is really about resourcefulness. As a certified teacher and passionate mom-preneur, Joanna is always looking for ways to ensure that students connect with these opportunities and get the valuable information they need to make informed decisions about education.
Sun 16 February 2020
Leverage LinkedIn to expand your network.'
Bree is a Career Consultant, CEO of HD Career Consulting LLC and podcast host of Who Ate My Cake Podcast, with over 15 years’ experience. She leverages her knowledge of workforce development trends, career pathways, education and training programs, HR process and hiring partnerships to systematically and strategically assess people's challenges to help them find careers that stick. She gained her experience and training working in higher education, training and development and parted ways with the institution in 2018 to launch HD Career Consulting with the mission to bring career exploration and development services to working adults struggling to navigate careers efficiently and effectively because we all deserve Work + Happy.  
Her expertise
o   Adult Teaching, Learning and Career Development Specialist.
o   Member of the National Career Development Association.
o   Published Research Author in the Journal of Career Development.
o   Former peer reviewer for the Journal of Career Development.
o   Podcast host and creator of Who Ate My Cake, An all things career podcast.
o   Former Student Affairs Practitioner, and Graduate Student SuccessPrograms Creator and Evaluator.

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