Chip Stapleton
Chip Stapleton
According to PwC (2016) the TOP Financial Concern among Employees is not having enough emergency savings. This and other financial stresses - like retirement, college funding, debt and medical expenses - lead to less productivity, increased absenteeism, and reduced morale in your workforce.

At Horizon Planning Group, we work with Businesses, their owners, executives, and employees to ensure they have the tools and resources to achieve Financial Wellness and avoid the pitfalls of traditional financial planning. We help solve a common problem using what boils down to common sense solutions, but through an Uncommon Perspective. Check out more at: www.horizonplanninggroup.com/wealth-steps-et3sm

We also know that 4 out of 5 Business Owners are looking to exit their business in the next 10 years. So with an eye to that, we work with the owners to create an exit strategy that is tax efficient and beneficial to all parties.

I have lived in Carmel, Indiana for 6 years with my wife and two daughters. In between running my daughters to Karate and relaxing at home, I also teach Saxophone and General Music courses at IUPUI in the Music & Arts Technology Department.

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Articles
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Wed 6 January 2021
Let's talk about Impossible Goals - or as a colleague of mine calls them BHAGs (Big, Hairy, Audacious Goals). These are goals that seem completely ridiculous today but speak directly to what you want in your core being. 
 
It most likely is impossible today. But I learned that "Impossible" is temporary. We have been told that your goals need to not be "Impossible." Not exactly worded that way, but that was the intent. Many times, you hear “Make the goal realistic” or “Attainable.” And I agree with that, to an extent. I have found that often what a person thinks is realistic to them, is far less than they could actually achieve. So, setting a goal that is impossible today, doesn't mean to it won't be possible tomorrow. Every little step you take opens doors and opportunities that didn't exist before. 
 
However, the goal cannot be arbitrary. For example, if my BHAG is something like “I want to be worth $10 million dollars.” by itself is not good enough. I need to be emotionally connected to the impossible to achieve it. In other words, WHY do I want to be worth $10 million dollars? Why $10 million? Are the reasons materialistic? Philanthropic? The motivations behind the goal are just as important as the goal itself. Otherwise, when the inevitable setbacks that happen along the way, I would be more likely to give up.
 
If you have an impossible BHAG – ask yourself WHY do I want to achieve this goal, then map out the steps needed to achieve it, and take the first step, then the next. Sometimes that’s all it takes to make the impossible, possible.
Wed 1 July 2020
My dad started in the limestone industry in Bloomington, IN when he was 19. After some stops at a few
different companies, he landed as a draftsman for the company he worked for, ended up owning, and
eventually sold some 35 years later. He has been my most consistent mentor to date, as parents tend to
be. However, a decade into my career, my path already has looked vastly different than his. Far from the
straight line, that he experienced, and we are often told to expect. The best laid scheme’s o’ mice an’
men, as Burns would say.

But through this horizontal mentorship program and speaking with my mentor partner, I have learned
that the straight career path is not the norm. It is very uncommon now. Which honestly does not
surprise me too much, that it describes my dad’s experience. My dad hates change. He and my mom still
live in the house they bought the month I was born, almost 36 years later.

The path we take is uniquely ours. And sometimes we stumble into a position or field that we never
thought we would enjoy, or even have a passion for. That was me with finance. It was a long path that
lead me into this field. But it started and ended with teaching. I still have a little bit of the stubborn
resistance to change that I get from my dad, but I am learning not be afraid of an opportunity that
presents a new challenge. I have a plan for where I am now and where I want to go, but I have Burns’
quote from To a Mouse reminding me to embrace the change.

Until next time.

-Chip

Building Mentor Connections Through Work Orientation

Kickstarting Mentorships For Fulfilling Careers